THE EFFECT OF PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

Program: Abstracts - Orals, Featured Poster Presentations, and Posters
Session: SUN 839-872-Diabetes & Obesity Management
Clinical
Sunday, June 16, 2013: 1:45 PM-3:45 PM
Expo Halls ABC (Moscone Center)

Poster Board SUN-859
Kelly Villegas*1, Maureen Long1, Julio Lopez1, Joy Meier1 and Arthur Swislocki2
1VA Northern California Health Care System, Martinez, CA, 2VA N CA Hlth Care System, Martinez, CA
Purpose of Study:

The purpose of this study was to replicate previous studies and evaluate the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes by comparing A1C values to a similar group of patients with type 2 diabetes not using a PPI. 

 Methods Used:

This study was a retrospective multicenter electronic data analysis using data obtained from healthcare facilities within Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) 21.  VA patients were included if they had established care within VISN 21 and had type 2 diabetes with an A1C > 6.5%, were using a PPI concurrently with stable doses of metformin or sulfonylurea monotherapy, had more than one prescription fill for metformin, sulfonylurea or a PPI, had at least two documented A1C values, and a medication possession ration (MPR) > 80% for metformin, sulfonylurea or a PPI. Veterans were excluded if they were using insulin, combination antihyperglycemic therapy, or oral corticosteroids.  We also looked for differences in pre- and post-body mass index (BMI), serum potassium, or use of other medications known to affect glycemic control between the treatment and control groups.

 Summary of Results:

A total of 195 patients were in the treatment group and 2,330 patients were in the control group for the final analysis. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the treatment and control groups. There was a statistically significant decrease in A1C within each group.  However, there was no statistically significant difference between the treatment and control group in the post-A1C. There were no significant differences in pre- and post-BMI, serum potassium, or use of other medications known to affect glycemic control between the treatment and control groups.

Conclusion:

In patients with type 2 diabetes, A1C improved in both groups but PPI addition did not affect glycemic control. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the value of PPIs as a treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes.

Nothing to Disclose: KV, ML, JL, JM, AS

*Please take note of The Endocrine Society's News Embargo Policy at http://www.endo-society.org/endo2013/media.cfm