ASSOCIATION OF HYPERTENSION WITH VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN AMBULATORY PATIENTS IN SOUTHERN NEVADA

Program: Abstracts - Orals, Featured Poster Presentations, and Posters
Session: MON 238-262-Vitamin D Action, Deficiency & Disorders
Bench to Bedside
Monday, June 17, 2013: 1:45 PM-3:45 PM
Expo Halls ABC (Moscone Center)

Poster Board MON-262
Abhijeet Yadav*1, Karen Schlauch2 and Kenneth E Izuora1
1University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV, 2University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV
ASSOCIATION OF HYPERTENSION WITH VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN AMBULATORY PATIENTS IN SOUTHERN NEVADA

YADAV, ABHIJEET, MD; SCHLAUCH, KAREN, MS, PhD; IZUORA, KENNETH, MD, MBA


OBJECTIVE

To compare the prevalence of hypertension (HTN) among ambulatory patients with normal and those with low 25 OH Vitamin D (Vit D) levels.


METHODS

This is a retrospective chart review looking at all patients who had their Vit D level tested for any reason. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum Vit D < 30 ng/ml. Data was collected on Vit D level, age, gender, ethnicity, BMI, diagnosis of HTN or treatment with anti-hypertensive medication, and current smoking status. Data collection is currently on- going.


RESULTS

Out of 243 consecutive patients, 201 (83%) had low Vit D. To determine whether Vit D levels, along with age, gender, ethnicity, smoking, and BMI were effective predictors of HTN, several stepwise logistic regression models were developed based on 139 patients with complete data. We found that age and ethnicity were significant predictors of HTN (p<0.00001 and p<0.05 respectively). Focusing on the ethnic groups, only the African-American subgroup (N=38) had a statistically significant association between HTN and low Vit D (p=0.025).


CONCLUSION

Our findings so far show a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (83%) in our study population. Overall, low Vit D was not a significant predictor for HTN. Age and ethnicity were significant predictors of HTN and among all patients, African American patients with low Vit D had the highest prevalence for HTN.

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Nothing to Disclose: AY, KS, KEI

*Please take note of The Endocrine Society's News Embargo Policy at http://www.endo-society.org/endo2013/media.cfm

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