IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF MATERNAL PLASMA PROTEINS THAT PREDICT PRETERM LABOUR

Program: Abstracts - Orals, Featured Poster Presentations, and Posters
Session: SAT 498-531-Female Repro Endocrinology & Case Reports
Clinical
Saturday, June 15, 2013: 1:45 PM-3:45 PM
Expo Halls ABC (Moscone Center)

Poster Board SAT-521
Catherine Sophie Hillman-Cooper*1, Mark Denbow2 and Andres Lopez Bernal3
1St. Michael's Hospital, United Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, United Kingdom, 2St. Michael's Hospital, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, United Kingdom, 3University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
Identification and Quantification of maternal plasma proteins that predict preterm labour

Dr Catherine Hillman-Cooper, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Michael's Hospital, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, UK

Mr Mark Denbow, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Michael's Hospital, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, UK

Prof. Lòpez Bernal, School of Clinical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

Introduction:

Prematurity is a ubiquitous obstetric problem, poorly understood at the molecular level.  Through proteomic analysis of maternal plasma proteins, this study aims to clarify specific proteins, implicated in the onset of preterm labour.

Methods:

Women presenting with threatened preterm labour (23-35 weeks gestation) were recruited from St. Michael’s Hospital, Bristol. Blood samples were taken at presentation and repeated ≤24 hours after spontaneous vaginal delivery. Patients were matched for gestation at presentation, positive Actim Partus swab and smoking status.

Four sets of women were assembled. Each set consisted of a standardised control, asymptomatic low-risk antenatal sample, antenatal and postnatal sample from a symptomatic woman delivering at term, and antenatal and postnatal sample from a symptomatic woman delivering preterm (n=12). The standardised control was made by combining aliquots of each sample used across the 4 sets.

Each sample was tagged using the tandem mass tagging method and the samples were analysed using the Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer.  Ratios of each protein within each sample were recorded, when compared to the standardised control, enabling changes in protein levels to be identified.

Results:

500 proteins were detected with confidence in the plasma samples. 192 proteins were measured in all four sample sets. The majority of proteins demonstrated small changes; however 10 proteins were identified as having decreased significantly in the preterm group when compared to the term group (p=≤0.015). The following proteins were identified; fibrinogen beta chain, fibrinogen gamma chain, alpha-2-HS glycoprotein, phosphatidylcholine-sterol acyltransferase, heparin co-factor 2, corticosteroid-binding globulin, apolipoprotein (a), complement factor H, complement factor H-related protein 2, cysteine-rich secretory protein.

Conclusion:

This study has identified specific proteins that are significantly reduced within the context of preterm labour. There is now a need to further understand how these proteins are implicated in the underlying mechanism of spontaneous labour. In addition, the precise quantification of the change in these proteins and further validation of the method using other quantitative techniques, is required. We aim to highlight specific proteins within maternal plasma that serve as a useful diagnostic tool for the reliable prediction of preterm labour.

Nothing to Disclose: CSH, MD, AL

*Please take note of The Endocrine Society's News Embargo Policy at http://www.endo-society.org/endo2013/media.cfm

Sources of Research Support: Grants bodies: 1. David Telling Charitable Trust, Bristol, UK 2. British Maternal and Fetal Medicine Society, UK