Richard P Lifton, MD, PhD

Chairman, Genetics
Yale Univ Schl of Med
Dept of Genetics

Biographical Sketch:
Richard Lifton is Chairman of the Department of Genetics, Sterling Professor of Genetics and Internal Medicine, Director of the Yale Center for Human Genetics and Genomics, and Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Yale University School of Medicine. He received his BA from Dartmouth, MD and PhD degrees from Stanford, and completed clinical training in Medicine at Harvard prior to moving to Yale in 1993. Dr. Lifton's laboratory has used human genetics and genomics to identify causes of heart, kidney, and bone disease. By investigating thousands of families from around the world, his group has identified more than 35 human disease genes. These include key genes and pathways that are critical to the risk of hypertension, stroke, heart attack, and osteoporosis. These studies have provided new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to these diseases, which affect more than 1 billion people world-wide. Dr. Lifton also Chairs the Scientific Advisory Board of Merck and the NIH Advisory Committee for Large Scale Genomic Sequencing. He serves on the Governing Councils of the Institute of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians, and on the Scientific Advisory Boards of The Simons Foundation Autism Project, The Gallo Foundation of the University of California, San Francisco, Broad Institute of Harvard, MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital. His honors include election to the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. He has received the highest scientific awards of the American Heart Association, the Council for High Blood Pressure Research, the American Society of Hypertension, the American Society of Neprhology, the International Society of Hypertension and the International Society of Nephrology. He received the 2008 Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences. In 2012, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Papers:
New Insights into Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma and Inherited Aldosteronism: Mutations in the K+ Channel KCNJ5
L5-1 New Insights into Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma and Inherited Aldosteronism: Mutations in the K+ Channel KCNJ5