S21 Rescuing GPCR Function in the HPG Axis

Program: Symposia
Basic Session
Thursday, March 5, 2015: 4:30 PM-6:00 PM
Room 23 (San Diego Convention Center)
**This session is eligible for CME credit**

Chair:
Aylin Hanyaloglu, PhD, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

Nothing to Disclose: AH

Probing the multiplicity of hormone signaling via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has demonstrated the complexity and highly exquisite regulatory mechanisms, which underlie the multiple functions these receptors play in vivo. This is highly pertinent for the GPCRs key in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor, luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor that are exposed to cyclical and dynamic changes in their extracellular milieu. In this session we will hear from three forefront leaders in this field in how these receptors can be exploited therapeutically, from allosteric targeting with cell permeable small molecule compounds, distinct region/s from the orthosteric hormone-binding region that can change the conformational profile of the receptor, leading to alterations in receptor trafficking/targeting and signaling. Furthermore, how receptor signaling via naturally occurring hormonal variants can reprogram its downstream actions in distinct tissues and may be a physiologically relevant process in female aging. Overall these findings can be applied more broadly in understanding the molecular dynamics mediating receptor-mediated cellular signaling, but also in the therapeutic treatment of a number of endocrine conditions.

4:30 PM
P Michael Conn, PhD, Office of Research, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX
Nothing to Disclose: PMC
5:00 PM
Robert Peter Millar, PhD, Mammal Research INstitute, Pretoria, South Africa
Disclosure: RPM: Ad Hoc Consultant, euroscreen.
5:30 PM
T. Rajendra Kumar, PHD, MSC, Dept of Mol & Integr Physiol, Kansas Univ Med Ctr, Kansas City, KS
Nothing to Disclose: TRK
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