Obesity and Indoor Cold Exposure: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Population-Based Study (The HEIJO-KYO Cohort)

Program: Abstracts - Orals, Poster Previews, and Posters
Session: FRI 600-625-Obesity I (posters)
Clinical/Translational
Friday, April 1, 2016: 1:15 PM-3:15 PM
Exhibit/Poster Hall (BCEC)

Poster Board FRI 608
Keigo Saeki*, Kenji Obayashi and Norio Kurumatani
Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan
Introduction

Adaptive thermogenesis induced by cold exposure may be useful for prevention from obesity. The mechanism of the hypothesis is partly explained by cold-induced activation of brown-adipose-tissue. In contrast, some experimental studies showed that cold exposure increase appetite and total energy intake. It remains unclear whether the cold exposure in real life situation is associated with abdominal obesity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between indoor cold exposure and obesity among elderly individuals.

Methods

This cross-sectional analysis was performed on the baseline data of a community-based cohort study (HEIJO-KYO study). We measured indoor temperature of their home in every 10 min for 48 h and abdominal circumference among 1103 participants during winter (October to April) from 2010 to 2014.

Results

The mean age of all participants was 71.9 ± 7.1 (SD) years and 514 (46.6%) were male. We calculated mean indoor temperature for each participant while they stay at home in daytime. In the measurement days, the indoor temperature and outdoor temperature were 16.1 ± 3.7°C and 8.7 ± 4.8°C, respectively. All participants were divided into four groups by daytime indoor temperature as follows: Q1 (≤10°C; n=64), Q2 (10 to 15°C; n=346), Q3 (15 to 20°C; n=529), and Q4 (≥20°C; n=164). Mean abdominal circumference in Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q3 were 81.3cm (95% confidence interval: 79.2 to 83.5), 83.4cm (82.5 to 84.3), 84.2cm (83.5 to 85.0), and 84.9 cm (83.6 to 86.3), and showed significant and positive association with daytime indoor temperature (Pfor trend = 0.003). After adjusting for age, gender, current smoking, ethanol intake, household income, education length, daytime outdoor temperature, physical activity measured using actigraph, and energy intake assessed using food frequency questionnaire, the association remained significant (P = 0.022). Compared with the coldest indoor temperature group (Q1: 82.0 cm), adjusted mean circumference in Q3 (84.4 cm; P = 0.041) and Q4 (84.8 cm; P= 0.033) were significantly higher.

Conclusion

We found significant association between higher indoor temperature and higher abdominal circumference among elderly independent of physical activity, total energy intake, and socioeconomic status.

Disclosure: KS: Researcher, YKK AP Inc., Researcher, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Researcher, EnviroLife Research Institute Co., Ltd., Researcher, Sekisui Chemical Co., Ltd.. KO: Researcher, YKK AP Inc., Researcher, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Researcher, EnviroLife Research Institute Co., Ltd., Researcher, Sekisui Chemical Co., Ltd.. Nothing to Disclose: NK

*Please take note of The Endocrine Society's News Embargo Policy at https://www.endocrine.org/news-room/endo-annual-meeting/pr-resources-for-endo